dealing with clients

Discussion in 'Web Design' started by LouTheDesigner, Oct 22, 2008.

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  1. LouTheDesigner

    LouTheDesigner New Member

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    I had to delete this.
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2009
  2. Studio472

    Studio472 New Member

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    About the cap on the estimate. That's what an estimate is for, it's just an estimate. The best way to make sure you don't go over (and you sound like you won't) is to be VERY specific in the description of the Scope of work for the site. That way, you can say later, "That's outside the defined scope of work and wasn't included in the estimate"...

    The 2nd one is easy, just let them know you invoice at $50 an hour and that is worked into the estimate...

    Don't sell yourself short, be polite but don't let people push you around. PS - If my normal hourly rate was 50hr, I wouldn't go below $35 (even for friends/family)
     
  3. LouTheDesigner

    LouTheDesigner New Member

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    Thanks,

    You're definitely right about being specific in the estimate's details. I even put a note at the bottom of the estimate stating,

    "This is an estimate based on our initial planning meeting. Additional requests may incur additional charges."

    What bugs me, however, is that she was worried about the estimate increasing because she thought that $1,000 is very high already. I thought (and some fellow experienced designers agree) that $1,000 is a bargain considering that this site is going to require some actionscript. I suppose she doesn't know any better, but I hope she doesn't have any friends telling her that I'm ripping her off.
     
  4. Studio472

    Studio472 New Member

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    You get what you pay for. Applies to everything.
     
  5. voodish

    voodish New Member

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    Sound advice there.
    It is highly likely she would have received several estimates from other companies, so she must have liked your work and/or gave the best estimate -- just be extremely detailed in your documentation and you should be good to go.

    I would definitely specify payment in chunks too; requiring a % upfront.
     
  6. fromthe5

    fromthe5 New Member

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    Simple. Just tell her that you can't afford to work for $xx an hour. Ask her how much per hour she makes. If it's $20 per hour ask her if she would do the same work for $7 per hour. After training sales people for 20 years I can tell you that a good percentage of people will ask for a deal. It's their God given right. Few people actually expect to get one. In many cases if you throw in just a little something extra you will have given them a small victory, but a victory nonetheless and you will have made the sale.
     
  7. 3dmagicaldesign

    3dmagicaldesign New Member

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    Tell her that you can't afford to work for this fee, tell her that your fees per hour are $50 and try to make a deal with her, if she agrees $35 that would be nice, you can still work on her project, if she doesn't she needs to go to a Chinese company.
     
  8. LouTheDesigner

    LouTheDesigner New Member

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    506
    Thanks for the advice everyone!

    Just thought I'd give you all updates. As for the client who wanted a cap on the estimate, I reassured her that my estimates are accurate, and that an estimate isn't just a wild guess. She agreed to pay the $1,000, but claimed that she though it would be half that amount ($500). How would a flash site, almost exactly like karlacolletto.com, only cost $500? If there are any experienced flash developers here, could you tell me if you think the $1,000 estimate is reasonable for a site just like karlacolletto.com?

    The lady who wanted me to work for less than $20 an hour had, I'm guessing, tried looking for other designers to work for that amount, since she originally said that she is going to call around to look for something cheaper. She contacted me again and we agreed at $40 an hour.

    Are clients always going to try to make me feel as if I'm overpricing?

    -Louis
     
  9. suz

    suz New Member

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    I think you might enjoy reading "12 breeds of clients and how to work with them" over at FreelanceSwitch
     
  10. pingeyeg

    pingeyeg New Member

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    Just tell her "Think you for the opportunity to earn your business, but the price you are looking for is not available for what you are wanting." The customer will understand, trust me. She might even respect it and bargain with you.
     
  11. seoexpert

    seoexpert New Member

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    I start my price high on purpose knowing that some people want to go down in price. After than go down it goes to my normal pricing, they think they got a deal, you walk away happy. Unfortunately that is a big marketing tactic that is necessary.

    Second, just tell that this is your pricing you can't go below that.
     
  12. constanthosting

    constanthosting New Member

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    I agree, If any company threw me something. It would likely please me a bit more concerning that company. If I am pleased I am more likely to tell someone else. Word of mouth is still the best advertising. :)
     
  13. Bronzy

    Bronzy New Member

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    59
    Hi

    If you are new to this field please earn some experience in that field .You are experienced and professional designer clients not ask for bargaining they know your quality.If you have a work in some cheap cost take it and practice.
     

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