Compression remnants

Discussion in 'Graphic Design' started by Mattybrown, Jul 1, 2006.

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  1. Mattybrown

    Mattybrown New Member

    Messages:
    6
    I have a photographer friend who says she has been told that the photographs in the gallery on her current website have 'compression remnants' - see this site.

    www.njhphotos.co.uk


    Can anyone tell me what compression remnants are and what to do about them?


    Thanks.
     
  2. ISDProductions

    ISDProductions New Member

    Messages:
    231
    I think their freind is blowing smoke up their, well you know.

    The photos look good to me, by compression remnants, I am guessing they either mean, that the photos look "over compressed" or that the photos are being shrunk by the browser, thumbnails should be different images, rescaled to have the best image quality.

    But in the case of this site, the images look good.

    That being said, I am veiwing them at 1280 x 1024. At 800x600 they could look like crap. I really don't think thats the case. They look good to me.
     
  3. audiohominis

    audiohominis New Member

    Messages:
    3
    The JPEG image format relies on a lossy cosine compression formula to reduce the file size at the expense of quality.
    There really isn’t much you can do about the remnants other than not applying too much compression, or avoiding JPEG completely by substituting it with other picture formats that utilize lossless deflate/run-length encoding algorithms instead. PNG (ping), for one, is a good alternative. However, if you want to save a high-resolution image while keeping the file size to the minimum, the remnants are inevitable.
    Using visibly compressed images as source material in commercial artwork is generally considered “poor graphic designership”.
     
  4. AunStudio

    AunStudio New Member

    Messages:
    14
    More on PNG's

    Aside of the advantages already listed above, PNG's also offer transparency capability just like the GIF format does. The difference is that GIF is indexed, offering only 256 colors whereas PNG is 24 bit.

    However, I've been having problems matching web colors background-wise speaking with the PNG format, specially if you choose this format for slicing in programs like Fireworks.

    Cheers.
     

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