I wnat to design my own templates - where to begin?

Discussion in 'Web Design' started by retro woman, Jun 8, 2011.

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  1. retro woman

    retro woman New Member

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    I have done a basic web design course a few years ago so I know some html and have done a couple of websites for myself.
    I am now looking to design my own templates for resale. There is so much info out there but I am not sure exactly what I need for designing templates as opposed to general website design?
    Should I do a Dreamweaver course? Do I need to learn CSS?
    Time is not a problem, I figure I can spend time while my toddler is at home learning what I need to know and when he goes to kinda/school I would like to design sites and templates for resale.
    I just don't want to book into a course at this stage and find that it is not relevant to my needs. ie, designing templates mainly.
    Thanks!
     
  2. Tim

    Tim New Member

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    You should just make a html page in dreamweaver and save as template, but make sure you keep the things open where you still want peaple to add content in.

    And css is pretty important for a website yes, without css it usually doesnt look that good.
     
  3. retro woman

    retro woman New Member

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    Thanks Tim,
    I have the trial of Dreamweaver, I will have a play around with it and maybe to an online course in CSS.
    Not sure what you mean by 'make sure you keep the things open where you still want peaple to add content in' but that will probably make sense to me once I get to know what I am doing.

    :)
     
  4. lanmys

    lanmys New Member

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  5. d a v e

    d a v e New Member

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    or fireworks or gimp or paintshop pro or...
     
  6. notarypublic

    notarypublic New Member

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    Learning CSS is a must. I was using Dreamweaver templates for a long time, until someone pointed out how difficult they are to work with; you're much better off learning to design templates as PHP documents instead.

    Also, something to consider - Designing a template takes most of the same skills as designing the rest of the website; the only difference is that going that single step further requires adding content to the page. In order to sell someone a template design, you have to have fairly strong graphic design skills. People are much more willing to work with someone that can help them with content, even if their designs aren't quite as flashy as something a template would offer.
     
  7. rahmanpaidar

    rahmanpaidar New Member

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    It's best you start with a template. Try to alter items and watch the results.
    For a commercial design, you need to learn a few things such as HTML, CSS, and
    client side javascript. Then proceed your road to one of server side langiages such as
    PHP or .NET.
     
  8. karlpalmer33

    karlpalmer33 New Member

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    If you don't have a knowledge on how to create one, then you should look for tutorials.
     
  9. hwade

    hwade New Member

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    Nonprofit Website

    As you branch out into the internet you will find hundreds of details you never thought about. Building a web site is not simple but it can be very rewarding. Starting your site with a web design template can help you concentrate on building the other aspects of your site - like content and visitors.
     
  10. ronaldroe

    ronaldroe Super Moderator Staff Member

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    These are the only good advice you've received so far. Thought I'll admit I personally use and prefer it, you don't need Photoshop, especially at the price. You also don't need Dreamweaver. And it really isn't good form to use templates to make templates for sale. Learn to code things from scratch, do your own graphics, then sell that.
     
  11. CaldwellYSR

    CaldwellYSR Member

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    I agree with the post above me. CSS is an absolute must! w3schools has good tutorials and you can find pretty much all you need to know about CSS online (it's easy). I would not use Dreamweaver if it were me. Dreamweaver costs way too much money and it gives you pretty wonky code. I would learn to code from scratch using an editor like Aptana. Coding from scratch takes longer but it gives you better control of the final product. With html and css you can pretty much make anything you want. You don't need photoshop or fireworks or anything like that if you can learn to code from scratch.
     
  12. krymson

    krymson Member

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    I personally use Dreamweaver, I don't let it create the code for me i write all the code myself, i so use the code hinting from time to time but other than that its all me, i would say you do need a decent graphics program to create images, Photoshop is by far the best but there are plenty of alternatives that don't cost as much or are completely free.

    VALID HTML and CSS are a must, because if you're building templates you don't want them to be poorly coded and have some other poor individual to come along look at your work and complain that they've spent money on a poorly coded product. It would ruin your reputation before you even get one. So that means NEVER EVER EVER EVER use tables as a design method.

    Moreover, getting diverse in your scripting languages to add features to your templates will allow you to sell them at a little bit higher price, such as using jQuery sliders and menus. using php to use php includes (dont know if that's still cool, havent done it in a while) using HTML5 and CSS3 to stay up to date with current technologies. Basically keeping everything you produce fresh.

    Just my 2 and a half cents. ;)
     
  13. CaldwellYSR

    CaldwellYSR Member

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    I'm just curious, what about Dreamweaver makes it worth the money to you?
     
  14. ronaldroe

    ronaldroe Super Moderator Staff Member

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    It better be cool, I only just discovered this awesomeness.

    2 and a half? How do I cash that in? Do I have to wait for you to give your opinion again and just take the nickel?
     
  15. krymson

    krymson Member

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    @caldwell - The live code and design view, server side testing without the browser, clicking to change the doc type and the ability to see all the files connected to the main page. make life a lot easier to be able to open all the sperate files connected to an html file without having multiple windows open.

    @ronald - basically
     
  16. CaldwellYSR

    CaldwellYSR Member

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    Just so you know all of these things except changing the doctype with one click are possible with Aptana Studio 3. Which is absolutely free. Aptana also has code completion (just adds endtags when you make start tags and puts the second parenthesis or quotation mark) and plugins for ZenCoding and other things that are great for faster/more efficient coding. Only downside is it doesn't have the drag and drop feature but for someone coding from scratch it's a great free alternative to Dreamweaver.
     
  17. ronaldroe

    ronaldroe Super Moderator Staff Member

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    It does that too, from the right-click menu.
     
  18. CaldwellYSR

    CaldwellYSR Member

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    Oh awesome, didn't know that. Well there you go haha
     
  19. krymson

    krymson Member

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    Besides, I have a licensing with Adobe so I get them for dirt cheap or free so why kill a good deal. I do alot of beta testing for new releases but yet there are still thing adobe related i dont know about... sad
     
  20. CaldwellYSR

    CaldwellYSR Member

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    658
    That's awesome, I don't blame you at all for taking the deal. I just wondered why anybody spends that much money on Dreamweaver but you don't so that makes sense.
     

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