Australia Sucks!

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by Phreaddee, Aug 22, 2012.

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  1. Phreaddee

    Phreaddee Super Moderator Staff Member

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    1,978
    *sigh* at least you guys in america had some people kick up a stink about SOPA. Here is Australia our stupid government has just passed one of the dumbest (and incredibly invasive) bills ever, not even a peep out of anyone!

    Under the guise of "Cybercrime" every (read that again EVERY) australian will now have every single key stroke done on the internet tracked and stored in data farms for up to two years...which the police have complete powers to access (on the flimsiest evidence they can get) any time they want, and can charge you with anything they want.


    so F**K YOU Nicola Roxon, I hope you stuff up somewhere along the line and get your data audited and get the death penalty. that would be justice.

    (and yes read this, track it, and store it for 2 years, YOU are a dumb bitch!)
    and Stephen Conroy I'm watching you too.

    and for anyone who wants to be as outraged as I am,
    http://www.zdnet.com/au/cybercrime-bill-passes-senate-set-to-become-law-7000002971/

    grrrrrrr! [email protected]#[email protected]!#[email protected]!#%[email protected]!$%^^&%#^&!$&%* !!!!
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2012
  2. chrishirst

    chrishirst Well-Known Member Staff Member

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    2,639
    Sounds like time for a VPN. :)

    https://5vpn.net/enarticle/anonymous-vpn/

    I actually pay for have a VPN constantly available just in case I need to search from a different country rather than being "Internet invisible" and I have a fixed IP from my ISP, so with a VPN available I can "attack" my own servers without locking my self out.


    The ISPs should tell them what AOL said when this was being discussed a few years ago by the European Parliament over storing emails and search data.

    They simply stated that "There isn't enough computer storage on the Planet to hold seven days of our user data, never mind three months"
     
  3. chrishirst

    chrishirst Well-Known Member Staff Member

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    2,639
    Now c'mon Alan, don't hold back, just let us know how you really feel :D
     
  4. Phreaddee

    Phreaddee Super Moderator Staff Member

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    1,978
    and then a hacker cracks into the data farm.
    great way to ruin an entire digital economy in one fell swoop.
     
  5. ronaldroe

    ronaldroe Super Moderator Staff Member

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    This is why the conservatives and libertarians in the US fight so hard against the expansion of government. If we don't, we end up with laws like these. I know it seems mean spirited or uncaring to fight against certain issues from the outside, but so much more goes into those bills than just the original issue, and it generally amounts to growing government.

    Phreadee, any talk of taking it through the judicial system or repealing it (if that's even possible)?
     
  6. Phreaddee

    Phreaddee Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I very much doubt it ronald. sneakily it was disguised under smoke and mirrors and our useless opposition harping on about "the carbon tax and mining tax will ruin our country" so much frigging hot air coming out of his mouth that the announcement wasn't even newsworthy, only found out via the 24hr news channel. its also packaged in so much dry legalese that no one save those that really give a rats (ie our industry) had the patience to wade through the information. its really sad.

    and of course using nice big keywords like "piracy", "paedophilia" and "cybercrime" 99% of the population are brainwashed into believing it is actually good policy (which it isnt) on the one hand they are being progressive and rolling out the National Broadband Network, and on the other its this...the mind boggles!

    it was apparently based on a european model, anyone care to shed any light on this sort of policy in Europe? (Chris?) I am unfamiliar with this model, and i noticed you touched on it (slightly) in your post.
     
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2012
  7. chrishirst

    chrishirst Well-Known Member Staff Member

    Messages:
    2,639
    At the moment in the UK there has to be a court order obtained to access any individual's methods of communications, after demonstrating and proving to the judiciary that there is a need for such measure to be taken against that individual. Not that it seems to make any difference to some newspapers and journalists of course.

    The last attempt to implement such a law was in 2008 (http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2008/dec/31/privacy-civil-liberties) but was dropped after a public outcry on civil liberties and "human rights".

    Also under EU data protection rules, there are statutory limits on what data can be retained electronically and how long it can be kept for, something that Google fell foul of also in 2008, and more recently with their data collection during their "Street mapping" world tour.

    It's the "To get the right answers, you have to ask the right questions" psychology.

    Ask people if they want the authorities to help protect their bank accounts from fraud, keep their family safe from child molesters, keep the towns and cities safe from terrorist threats, rioters and malcontents, and the unequivocal answer will be YES!!!!

    Ask them if the authorities can monitor emails, SMS messaging, telephone messages, more CCTV coverage of public places and foreign travel to possibly gain early warnings of possible threats and the answer will be a resounding NO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
  8. AsheSkyler

    AsheSkyler New Member

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    177
    ...Some days I think countries are just the large-scale version of the medieval feudal lords who could do whatever they wanted to their peasants because there was a small chance of them having to answer for their actions.
     
  9. wayback64

    wayback64 New Member

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    I pretty much optimistic on this. I guess it should have its reason. Like right now, AUS is doing great in my opinion when compared to US. Correct me if I'm wrong please.

    read more
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2012
  10. Phreaddee

    Phreaddee Super Moderator Staff Member

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    1,978
    did you read the bill? or at least the links from this thread?

    economically we might be doing better.
    we had a good prime minister who got the boot, and now the replacement is bending over backwards to get the support of the conservatives, and our opposition is ultra conservative, as a result draconian laws like this one get passed.

    I don't see that as progress, nor do I see it as a reason to be optimistic.

    whilst I do not know enough about US and policy to make comment, I think you guys will be in a bad place if that romney character gets the presidency...
     
  11. ronaldroe

    ronaldroe Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Conservatives here are against bills like those. "Conservative" has a slightly different meaning here. Romney, along with a vast majority of Republicans were all against SOPA. It was the liberals here who were shooting for that.

    Don't get me wrong, I'm not really a fan of Romney. He has one thing going for him, though: he's not Obama...
     
  12. Phreaddee

    Phreaddee Super Moderator Staff Member

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    1,978
    here liberal = conservative
     
  13. Phreaddee

    Phreaddee Super Moderator Staff Member

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    1,978
    and now labor = conservative

    what a choice we've got!
     
  14. ronaldroe

    ronaldroe Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Ya. Usually, "labor" amounts to something close to our Democrats (liberals). Here, it has to do with a conservative vs liberal interpretation of our Constitution, though some other unrelated issues do separate pretty consistently as well.
     
  15. MrDougJay

    MrDougJay New Member

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    15
    Tell me about it. It's the same in the Philippines. I have people from the Philippines working for me. They are complaining about this stupid law that the senators made. It's called Cyber Crime Law. With this law you can go to jail for 12 years simply by posting, liking, sharing offensive post to the government.
     
  16. AsheSkyler

    AsheSkyler New Member

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    177
    I guess the lawmakers don't take their constitution very seriously, eh? Good grief, 12 years even if it's as simple as "the government doesn't know anything about paving roads"? I'd hate to see what they do about real crimes like piracy and hacking.
     
  17. MrDougJay

    MrDougJay New Member

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    Yup, I think it's stupid. 12 years is too much, community service should only be the punishment. Instead of making stupid laws like that, why don't they use the money for making schools, hospitals, roads, jobs, and etc. I'm sure they need these more than that law.
     
  18. ronaldroe

    ronaldroe Super Moderator Staff Member

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    This is why people need to quit trusting government to do anything at all.
     
  19. MrDougJay

    MrDougJay New Member

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    We don't trust them but we can't do anything against them. Well, civil war I guess. :D
     
  20. leroy30

    leroy30 New Member

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    485
    How would they track your keystrokes without planting a key logger in your computer or every website on the web?
     

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